Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology, International/Multicultural Concentration in D.C.


Concentration Description

Both domestically and abroad, the need for culturally competent mental health services far outweighs its availability.  In addition, hundreds of millions of people around the globe suffer from mental health conditions with little, if any, access to mental health services.  The International / Multicultural Concentration at our Washington, D.C. campus attempts to bridge these gaps by developing practitioners skilled in culturally appropriate service delivery.  Students in this concentration of the Clinical Psychology program may work in a wide variety of capacities and roles.  These include providing mental health interventions to underserved populations or to those suffering from the results of cultural crisis or natural disasters; conducting research to better understand socio-cultural differences; developing and applying culturally competent organizational practices; serving as program managers or senior administrators at community-based agencies; leading grassroots education and outreach programs to enhance accessibility; advocating and raising awareness about international mental health needs; and working with immigrant and refugee populations at home and abroad. 

Degree
  • Bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution
Coursework
  • 18 semester hours of psychology credit with grades earned of C or better including three specific courses;
    • Abnormal Psychology
    • Statistics
    • Child/Human Development or Lifespan
Additional
  • N/A
Admission Requirements

GRE Requirements

Sample Courses

International Perspectives on Mental Health

This course introduces student to international perspectives in mental health. The course consists of a preparatory seminar and an in-country portion. As part of the in-country portion, students will participate in a variety of mental-health related and cultural activities. Students will learn about mental health delivery, socio-cultural issues, and cultural diversity as they relate to the country visited. The course includes both experiential and academic work on international perspectives in mental health

Gender and Global Human Rights

This course examines gender and human rights within the context of the international human rights system and in the context of global feminist, civil, liberation, and human rights movements. This course will provide a foundation for understanding the human rights system and examine how gendered human rights violations, particularly those against women around the world impede the actualization of human rights, justice, and wellness for all. The interdependency of political, civil, social, economic, and cultural systems will be utilized in understanding issues of gender justice and human rights in general. The course will focus on several thematic issues such as domestic violence, trafficking, genocide and gender, and genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) by utilizing a number of historical and current cases from countries in numerous world regions.

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