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Chante DeLoach

Chante DeLoach

Clinical Adjunct Faculty
  • Department Faculty
    Clinical Psychology
    Associate Professor
  • The Chicago School Chicago
Department
Clinical Psychology
Address
The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Office Location
Office Phone
On-campus Ext.
Email
CDeLoach@thechicagoschool.edu
Website
Biography
Dr. DeLoach completed her predoctoral internship at the California State University Long Beach Counseling Center and worked as a staff psychologist and affiliate faculty member at College of the Holy Cross prior to joining the faculty at The Chicago School. Dr. DeLoach has clinical and research experience within university counseling centers, medical centers, and community mental health center settings. Her areas of research interest are in experiences of racism, sexism, health disparities, African psychology, and sociocultural consciousness, and hip hop music. Dr. DeLoach earned a doctorate in clinical psychology with a degree specialization in family psychology from Azusa Pacific University in 2003.
Education
  • B.A. in Psychology, Minor in Spanish, University of North Texas
  • M.A. in Clinical Psychology, Azusa Pacific University
  • Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology (degree specialization in Family Systems), Azusa Pacific University
  • Certificate of Global Mental Health, Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma
Licensure(s)
Licensed Clinical Psychologist: IllinoisTrauma Recovery Certificate
Areas Of Expertise

Select Presentations

  • Swaroop, S., Hijazi, A., & DeLoach, C. (2013). Moving towards peace: Exploring healing from war-related conflict. Symposium presented for the 2013 Benjamin V. Cohen Peace Conference: Promoting Nonviolence at Home and Beyond. Muncie, IN.

  • Covington, S., & DeLoach, C. (2012). Tradition-based Approaches to Justice: An Ethno-gendered Exploration of Community Reintegration and Trauma Recovery among Burundian Women Ex-combatants. Workshop presented at the 29th Annual Teachers College Winter Roundtable on Cross-Cultural Psychology and Education, New York, NY and the Association of Black Psychologists Conference, Los Angeles, CA.

  • DeLoach, C. (2012). Getting started in private practice: The art and business of an African-centered private practice. Invited presentation for the Association of Black Psychologists annual convention, Los Angeles, CA.

  • Young, S., & DeLoach, C. (2012). African American women and rape: A needs assessment and Program Development. Presentation at the Association of Black Psychologists Conference, Los Angeles, CA. 

  • Abrams, A., DeLoach, C., Bolden, M., & Ball, J. (2008) Boondocks: Using Provocative Media in Teaching Internalized Oppression, Religious Misorientation, and Political Imprisonment. Poster Presentation at the Society for Psychological Study of Social Issues Conference. Chicago, IL

  • Abdul-Adil, J., & DeLoach, C., Roland, B., & McIntosh, C. (2008). Rap Music Interventions with Urban Minority Youth. Poster Presentation at the Society for Community Research and Action. Chicago, IL

  • Bolden, M.A., Pieterse, A., Williams III, O., DeLoach, C., & Ball, J. (2008, February).  A Fanonian Approach to Reparations against the Medical, Military, Media, Educational, and Prison Industrial Complexes for the Global African Community. Workshop presented at the 25th Annual Teachers College Winter Roundtable on Cross-Cultural Psychology and Education, New York, NY.

  • Bolden, M.A., Williams III, O., DeLoach, C., Ball, J., & Pieterse, A., (2008, August). Of Penal Colonies and Neo-Plantations: Fanon and Reparations from South Africa to the U.S. Symposium presented at the 40th Annual Convention of the Association of Black Psychologists, Oakland, CA.

  • Buhin, L., & DeLoach, C. (2007). Working for social justice: Examining connections among beliefs about psychologists’ roles, just world, and professional psychology training. Workshop presented at the 24th Annual Teachers College Winter Roundtable on Cross-Cultural Psychology and Education, New York, NY.

  • Petersen, M., & DeLoach, C. (2011). A Dialogue of Resistance and Liberation: The Healing Effects of Candomble’ in an Afro-Brazilian Community. Paper presentation at the 2011 Winter Roundtable Conference on Cultural Psychology and Education. Teachers College Columbia University.

  • Swaroop, S., & DeLoach, C. (2011). Phenomenological perspectives on Pakistani displament-related distress and healing:  Implications for Evidence-based therapies. Poster presentation at the 2011 Winter Roundtable Conference on Cultural Psychology and Education. Teachers College Columbia University.

  • Tiberi, T., & DeLoach, C. (2007). Toward Culturally Centered Relational Research: Feminist Application of Focused-Dyadic Interviewing. Poster presentation at the Association of Women in Psychology Conference.

  • Tiberi, T., & DeLoach, C., & Roekle, M. (2007). &6I’m just asking for one chance&8: Help-seeking experiences of female ex-offenders living in the community. Poster presentation at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

  • DeLoach, C. (2004). Feelings of Exclusion: Programming for African American Women with HIV. Presented for the American Psychological Association Annual Convention. Honolulu, HI

  • DeLoach, C., & Rowe, D. (2004). Focused dyadic interviewing: An African-Centered Qualitative Research Methodology. Presentation at the Association of Black Psychologists Annual Convention. Washington, D.C

  • Chalovich, P., Moody, J., & DeLoach, C. (2001). The Effects of Domestic Violence on Early Childhood Development: Strategies and Implications for Parents, Teachers, and Counselors. SELPA (Special Education Local Plan Area) Conference: Lancaster, California.

Select Publications

  • DeLoach, C. (2002). Beyond Optimism: Toward an Action-Oriented Social Justice Agenda. California Psychologist. California Psychological Association: Sacramento, California.

  • DeLoach, C. (2007). Book review: Naked: Black women bare all about their skin, hair, hips, lips, and other parts. Sex Roles 54, (9-10), 733-734.

  • DeLoach, C. (2008). Our responsibility as global citizens. Insight Magazine, Spring 2008.

  • DeLoach, C.D., Bolden, M.A., & Ball, J.A. (2010). The Boondocks and Black Power: Using Provocative Media in Teaching Internalized Oppression, Religious Misorientation, and Political Prisoners. Manuscript in final preparation for submission.

  • DeLoach, C., & Petersen, M. (2010). African spiritual methods of healing: The use of Candomble’ in traumatic response. Journal of Pan African Studies3(8), 40-65.

  • The Fanon Project (2010). Beyond Health Disparities: Examining Health Disparities and Industrial Complexes from the Views of Frantz Fanon (Part 1). Journal of Pan African Studies, 3(8), 151-178.

  • DeLoach, C. (2012). Couples therapy with Black couples: Specific treatment strategies and techniques. In Helm, K., & Carlson, J. (Eds). Love, intimacy, sex, and the Black couple. Routledge.

  • DeLoach, C. (2012). Bon kouraj: Learning courage through service. In Carlson, J., & Kottler, J. (Eds). Helping Beyond the 50 Minute Hour: Therapists Involved in REAL Social Action.

  • Swaroop, S., DeLoach, C., Sheikh, F. (in press). Islamic Healing Approaches, Beliefs, and Health-related Behaviors. In Gurung, R. (Ed). Multicultural Approaches to Health and Wellness.

  • DeLoach, C., & Young, S. (2012). Genocide. Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. Available from Springer online.

  • DeLoach, C., & Young, S. (2012). Transformation. Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. Available from Springer online.

  • DeLoach, C., & Young, S. (2012). Womanism.  Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. Available from Springer online.

  • DeLoach, C., Petersen-Coleman, M., Young, S. (2012). Sex, Love, and Intimacy Issues with Intercultural Black Couples. In Helm, K., & Carlson, J. (Eds). Love, intimacy, sex, and the Black couple. Routledge. 

  • Swaroop, S., & DeLoach, C. (under review).  Phenomenological Perspectives on Trauma and Healing after Internal Displacement:  Implications for Evidence-Based Therapies with Pakistani Women. 

Community Involvement

  • Executive Board member (past-president) Chicago Chapter of the Association of Black Psychologists
  • Luminesce Psychological Services, LLC www.luminescepsych.com

Professional Memberships

  • Association of Black Psychologists
  • Psychologists for Social Responsibility

Q&A

Q: Please describe your teaching philosophy.

A: I understand my role as a teacher to be a facilitator of the learning process. My philosophy of teaching is that learning is best facilitated by an instructor who balances sound theory with effective pedagogy and a passion for the subject matter. I believe that teaching is a field of inquiry which necessitates continual commitment to scholarship in the field through engagement in research, participation in conferences or workshops, and mentoring or being mentored by others. A teacher must know what to teach as well as the best way to teach it. My three primary objectives as a teacher are to: 1) foster creative and critical thinking both inside and outside the classroom, 2) facilitate the acquisition of life-long learning skills, and 3) prepare students for change and to be changed.

Q: Please provide a statement or philosophy regarding the practice of psychology.

A: I believe that psychology is both an art and a science. It is simultaneously based upon the principles of science and academic rigor while necessitating creativity and imagination. It is fundamentally diverse in its scope and focus, and has the potential to have wide-reaching impact. I believe that "psychology" should be grand in its focus in understanding the human experience and all that it entails. A skilled psychologist should be educated and well-versed in myriad subjects, cultures, and disciplines. As such, modern psychologists are able to work as practitioners, teachers, researchers, activists, healers, consultants, and so much more in the public and private sectors. I believe that psychologists should be life-long learners; the ethical and competent practice of psychology necessitates a dynamic interchange of scholarship and self-exploration.

Q: Why did you choose to enter the field of psychology?

A: I was called to psychology to utilize my talents and gifts in a profession where I could help facilitate the healing process of wounded people, particularly those underserved and marginalized by psychology.

Q: What advice would you give to a student entering The Chicago School?

A: Understand that graduate school is a large commitment and requires personal sacrifice. The time and energy required necessitate change and growth. Entering a clinical program, in particular, requires a journey of personal growth and exploration beyond the rigorous academic challenges. The outcome is hopefully being a more self-aware and socially conscious individual capable to making a contribution to the discipline of psychology and the global community.

Learn more about her private practice.