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Sean Sterling, Ph.D., ABPP

Sean Sterling

Department Chair
  • Chair
    Applied Clinical Psychology
  • The Chicago School Irvine
Department
Applied Clinical Psychology
Address
The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
4199 Campus Dr Irvine, CA 92612
4199 Campus Dr
Office Location
Room 429B
Office Phone
949-769-7712
On-campus Ext.
7712
Email
ssterling@thechicagoschool.edu
Website
Biography
Private practice in forensic and clinical psychology. Research interests in a variety of domains, including forensic, hypnosis, and multi-cultural.
Education
  • B.A. Psychology, UC Santa Barbara
  • M.A. Psychology, The California School of Professional Psychology Berkeley/Alameda
  • Ph.D. Psychology, The California School of Professional Psychology Berkeley/Alameda
Licensure(s)
  • Licensed Psychologist, California
Areas Of Expertise

Select Presentations

  • Ames, M., Sterling, S., & Brodie, L. (2011). The Impact an Incarcerated Murder has on Their Family. Poster Paper presented at the 16th International Conference on Violence, Abuse, and Trauma. San Diego, CA. September  
  • Battle, A., Sterling, S., & Thomas, V. (2011). "Identifying Personality Differences between Sadistic and Non-Sadistic Sex Offenders Poster Paper presented at the California Coalition on Sex Offending. San Mateo, CA. May. 
  • Grajewski, L.J. & Sterling, S. (2011). The Impact of Military Sexual Trauma on Perceived Fitness for Duty. Poster Paper presented at the California Coalition on Sex Offending. San Mateo, CA. May. 
  • Grajewski, L.J. & Sterling, S. (2011). The Impact of Military Sexual Trauma on Perceived Fitness for Duty. Workshop Presentation at the 16th International Conference on Violence, Abuse, and Trauma. San Diego, CA. September. 
  • McMahon, H., Leark, R.A., Turner, J.T. & Sterling, S. (2011). An Exploration of the Construct Validity of the Empirical Scales of the M-PULSE using the MMPI-2 Clinical Scales. Poster Paper presented at the Society of Police & Criminal Psychology 37th Annual Meeting. Chicago, IL October. 
  • Pearson, H., Sterling, S., Maram, W. B. (May, 2011). Correlates of the MMPI-2 and AASI with Child Molester Typology. Poster presentation, California Coalition on Sexual Offending Conference, San Mateo, CA. May 
  • Semple, C. & Sterling, S. (2011). Maternal incarceration: Its effects on children and families. Presented at the Center for Child Advocacy's Sixth Annual Conference. Montclair, NJ. April. 
  • Sterling, S., Leark, R.A., Maram, W. (2011). Accurate assessment of aging sex offenders. Poster Paper presented at the International Association of Forensic Mental Health Annual Meeting. Barcelona, Spain. August. 
  • Trapold, J., Sterling, S., & Maram, W. (2011). Examining Differential Characteristics of Sex Offenders with a Measured Interest in Sexual Violence using the SRA: FV. Poster presentation at the California Coalition on Sexual Offending 14th Annual Training Conference. San Mateo, California. May.

Specialty Board Certification

  • American Board of Professional Psychology Certification in Clinical Psychology

Q&A

Q: Please describe your teaching philosophy. 

A. Teaching should be case oriented, and ultimately lead to skill acquisition. It should be practical, and it should be entertaining! 

Q: Please describe your philosophy regarding the practice of psychology. 

A. Psychologists are licensed to independently diagnose and treat mental illness. This is an important role in our society, and a heavy responsibility. Psychologists must be well trained, ethical, and compassionate. In my view, psychotherapy efficacy hinges upon the ability of the patient and therapist to form a meaningful relationship. There is art and science associated with psychotherapy, as the unique combination of personalities in every psychotherapy relationship needs to be understood and managed in a unique way. So good psychotherapy is never rote or dull, but is always an unfolding of something new and meaningful. 

Q: Why did you choose to enter the field of psychology? 

A. I have always been interested in, and motivated by, the opportunity to form meaningful relationships with people. 

Q: What advice would you give a student entering The Chicago School of Professional Psychology? 

A: Do the reading! Get started on your dissertation early, and work on it for ½ an hour per day until you finish it. Take your peer relationships seriously, as your peers will help you grow as you go through the program, and will eventually be consultants to you, referral sources, and your support network. Find a good psychologist and spend a year in psychotherapy, as that is the single most important thing you can do to ensure that you become an effective psychologist yourself someday. Thank your difficult professors, their high expectations will facilitate your development in this program.