Debra Warner

Debra

Warner

Debra Warner

Department Faculty

  •  
  • Campus:
  • Los Angeles
Department
Forensic Psychology
Institution
The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Address Map of 617 W 7th St Los Angeles CA 90017
Office 815
617 W 7th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90017
Office Phone
213-615-7203
Email
Biography

Dr. Warner received her Master of Arts and Master of Education in counseling psychology from Columbia University, Teachers College, in New York City. She completed her doctorate in Forensic Psychology from Alliant International University, in Fresno. She has served as an adjunct professor for several universities and as Lead Faculty for Chapman University's Marriage and Family Therapy program. She most recently was promoted to Full Professor and is the VIDA Volunteer Liaison for the Los Angeles campus of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology Psy.D. program in Clinical Forensic Psychology. She has also served as Special Assistant to the Dean of Academic Affairs: Diversity and Community Engagement and Lead/Chair for the Forensic Psychology department for Los Angeles and Irvine Campuses. Some of her other professional assignments have included the Department of Homeland Security, Los Angeles Police Department, C.U.R.E.-A Better Los Angeles, the Department of Defense, the Department of Corrections and Regional Center. For these assignments she designed the program elements related to mental health and evaluation. Moreover, she served as clinical supervisor relating to human trafficking, trauma, domestic violence, PTSD and multicultural therapeutic techniques.

In 2009 she received several awards and recognitions for community engagement from the Los Angeles City Attorney, the Department of Defense, Los Angeles Police Department and The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. In 2013 she was given a distinguished teaching award for Outstanding Public Service Teaching. She currently is a peer reviewer on several academic journals and is part of the Medical Advisory Board for Quality Health. She is on the board of directors for The National Partnership to End Interpersonal Violence Across the Lifespan (NPEIV) relating to public awareness and publicity. Currently, her research focuses on diversity issues connected to forensic community mental health and was psychological expert in a recent book and documentary on the subject.

She is an invited consultant involving academic program review and evaluation both nationally and internationally. She has created several community based programs for law enforcement and government agencies that focus on criminogenic needs and community intervention. She is also an invited speaker pertaining to community gang intervention. Moreover, Dr. Warner has created certification materials for mental health professionals in regards to domestic violence, trauma care, CAST, and child custody evaluations. She has also written a number of encyclopedia entries related to crime, social policy and justice for Sage publications and a published article for the Journal of Banking and Economics. In her spare time, she serves as Executive Director for her private practice/consulting business and creates conferences related to community gang intervention and violence with the support of law enforcement and mental health organizations. She now focuses her clinical endeavors on male survivor issues of abuse, violence and trauma. It should be noted that in all of Dr. Warner's professional endeavors she always involves and mentors students for professional development.

Education History
Degree Institution
B.A. Psychology University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA
M.A. Counseling Psychology Teachers College, Columbia University, NY
Psy.D. Forensic Pychology Los Angeles, CA
Professional Memberships
Role Organization
Member American Correctional Association
Member American Psychological Association
Member Illinois Correctional Association
Member National Association of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
Licenses
California
Community Involvement
Role Organization
2015 Board Member CAPIC
2014-15 Advisory Board Member Peace in the Hood, A Better LA
2014 Panelist Peace in the Hood, A Better LA
2014 Book Expert Peace in the Hood, Hunter House
2013-14 Co-Chair, Publicity and Public Relations National Partnership to End Interpersonal Violence Across the Lifespan, IVAT
2013-15 Board Member/Reviewer Medical Advisory Board, QualityHealth.com
2012-14 Reviewer Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, Taylor and Francis Group
2012-14 Reviewer Journal of Aggression Maltreatment and Trauma, Taylor and Francis Group
2012-14 Reviewer Journal of Child Adolescent Trauma, Taylor and Francis Group
2012-14 Planning Committee Institute on Violence Abuse and Trauma at Alliant International University
2013 Radio Expert Mass Shootings in the US, PSYC 1 on 1, Skidrow Studios
2012 Co-Director Community Think Tank, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles
2011 Radio Expert Pyromania, Media Tracks
2011 Speaker Maximum Force Enterprises Community Intervention Graduation, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles and A Better LA
2011 Panelist Teen Summit on Dating Violence and Bullying Prevention, The Positive Results Corporation
2010 Speaker Maximum Force Enterprises Community Intervention Graduation, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles and A Better LA
2010 Board Member Medical Advisory Board, QualityHealth.com
Areas of Expertise
Area Expertise
Addiction/Substance Abuse Contingency Management
Co-occurring Disorders
Applied Behavior Analysis Functional Analysis
Functional Behavior Assessment
Parenting
Time Management
Career/Workplace Issues Career Counseling
Work/Life Balance
Clinical Psychology / Mental Health Addictions
DSM/Diagnosis
Psychopathology
Diversity Ageism
Community Mental Health
Diversity Issues
Ethnic Identity Development
Ethnic/Racial Identity Models
Gender Issues, Class
Identity Development
Immigration/Immigrant Issues
Latino/a Mental Health
Oppression
Racial Identity Development
Racism
Racism and White Privilege
Religion and Spirituality
Sexism
Social Economic Status
Domestic Violence Child Abuse
Sexual Abuse
Spousal/Partner Abuse
PTSD/Trauma Crisis Intervention
Historical Trauma
Post-Traumatic Growth
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Secondary Traumatic Stress
Vicarious Trauma
Research Design/Methodology Mixed Methods Research
Qualitative Inquiry
Quantitative Inquiry
Statistics
Sexuality/Gender Issues Gender Identity
HIV/AIDS
LGBTQ
Therapeutic/Theoretical Orientation Adlerian Therapy
Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
Object Relations
Psychoanalysis
Violence Bullying
Gangs
Hate/Bias Crimes
Inner City Violence
Murder
Sexual Assault
Sexual Offenders
Presentations

Espinoza, R. C., Warner, D. (2015).The Potential for Change in Rehabilitation and Reentry for Behaviorally and Mentally Disordered Offenders in the Post-Affordable Care Act and Second Chance Act Health Care Climate. In Journal of Economics and Banking. In Press.

Both Gragg, J., Warner, D., & Kus, E., (2014).High school students perceived barriers to counseling services: Implications for mental health utilization in schools.Poster presented at the American Educational Research Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Warner, D., Espinoza, R. C. (2014).Hate crimes. In Encyclopedia of Surveillance, Security, and Privacy. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Warner, D., Espinoza, R. C. (2014).Marshall law. In Encyclopedia of Surveillance, Security, and Privacy. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Aquino, S., Espinoza, R. C.,Warner, D., (2014).The experience of YouTube. The SAGE Encyclopedia of Surveillance, Security, and Privacy. Sage Publications: CA.

Kus, E., Warner, D., (2014).Digital voyeurism The SAGE Encyclopedia of Surveillance, Security, and Privacy. Sage Publications: CA.

Warner, D., Khan S. Hill, L. M. Miguda-Armstead, S. and Bae, R. (2012).The examination of religious affiliation and substance abuse relating to the Los Angeles homeless population.Poster presented at the annual convention at the American Psychological Association, Orlando.

Pasqualetti, M., Warner, D., Harbaugh, J.C. Shaw, J. (2012). Examination of the role of malignant narcissistic personality disorder as a root of serial homicide.Poster presented at the annual convention at the American Psychological Association, Orlando.

Hill, L., Warner, D., Pasqualetti, M. (2011). How women expand personal comfort Zones of community/gang intervention training in Los Angeles.Paper presented at the annual convention of Family & Youth Roundtable's Conference on Stigma Discrimination and Disparities, San Diego

Warner, D. Pasqualetti, M. (2011). Market vs. Ethnicities, Role of Ethnicity. Encyclopedia of Transnational Crime and Justice. Sage Publications. CA.

Warner, D. Pasqualetti, M. (2011). Centralization.Encyclopedia of Transnational Crime and Justice. Sage Publications. CA.

Ross, E., Kao, C., Woodward, J., Hill, L., Warner, D. (2010).Gang intervention training in greater Los Angeles: A focus group.Poster presented at the annual convention at the American Psychological Association, San Diego.

Warner, D., Barnes, A., Leark, R. (2005, August). A Preliminary Analysis of Attorney Facial Expression. Paper presented at the annual convention at the American Psychological Association, Washington DC.

Question and Answer
Please describe your teaching philosophy.

My teaching philosophy is that I believe that students do not come to class as blank slates and often bring with them preconceived notions about the field of psychology. These preconceived notions may consist of false assumptions and generalizations that might block their leaning of psychology. As an instructor it is important for me to acknowledge that students bring past experiences into the classroom, and to also provide students with a more adequate view of psychology. However, to be effective in achieving this goal I have to challenge them to think differently and lessen their fear of psychology by seeing its relevance and application in their lives. I make a connection between the textbook and daily life experiences (i.e. Why did you marry your spouse or Why does your dog come to his food dish everyday at 4:00 p.m.?).

My role as the instructor is not only as a source of knowledge, but also a source of support and resources. I am approachable and available to answer questions. My belief is that the only silly question is the one not asked. I strive to be student-focused, competent, flexible and aware of student diversity. I love to get to know my students and I believe that the learning process is collaborative. Students not only learn from me and from each other, but that I learn from them. As I have learned through my teaching experiences, my role as a teacher shifts Throughout the learning process. I use myself as a springboard for illustration of concepts and catalyst for difficult discussions. I try to develop a safe learning environment were students are able to be honest, question their reasoning and learn to "think out of the box". I challenge my students to broaden their minds and enhance their awareness of culture, diversity and individual differences. I encourage them to apply what they have learned to their future interactions with others. It is very rewarding when students tell me that they think differently. Plus, how they have applied concepts learned in class to their lives and are better for it professionally and personally. In the past 14 years, I have come to find that the three objectives I have set as an instructor apply no mater what course I am teaching, 1) to facilitate the appreciation of psychology, 2) to provide fundamental knowledge and tools applicable to student's careers and 3) to enhance self-awareness and understanding of the world around them and the uniqueness of the individuals in it. The way I crystallize these objectives is by allowing the various aspects of who I am, professionally and personally, to be used in example as I take an active role in students learning in the classroom. I provide a fun and energetic atmosphere, while emphasizing much theoretical foundation. I accomplish this through using a multi-sensory curriculum. I employ films, audio equipment, Power Point slides, smart boards, experiential exercises and case studies to make material more tangible. In addition, I have begun to incorporate the use of Blackboard and other online technologies to communicate with students and provide supplemental learning. Moreover, I make use of facilitative methods to help students formulate their ideas in the classroom and aid others in their comprehension of the material.

My role as the instructor is not only as a source of knowledge, but also a source of support and resources. I am approachable and available to answer questions. My belief is that the only silly question is the one not asked. I strive to be student-focused, competent, flexible and aware of student diversity. I love to get to know my students and I believe that the learning process is collaborative. Students not only learn from me and from each other, but that I learn from them.

As I have learned through my teaching experiences, my role as a teacher shifts Throughout the learning process. I use myself as a springboard for illustration of concepts and catalyst for difficult discussions. I try to develop a safe learning environment were students are able to be honest, question their reasoning and learn to "think out of the box". I challenge my students to broaden their minds and enhance their awareness of culture, diversity and individual differences. I encourage them to apply what they have learned to their future interactions with others. It is very rewarding when students tell me that they think differently. Plus, how they have applied concepts learned in class to their lives and are better for it professionally and personally. In the past 14 years, I have come to find that the three objectives I have set as an instructor apply no mater what course I am teaching, 1) to facilitate the appreciation of psychology, 2) to provide fundamental knowledge and tools applicable to student's careers and 3) to enhance self-awareness and understanding of the world around them and the uniqueness of the individuals in it. The way I crystallize these objectives is by allowing the various aspects of who I am, professionally and personally, to be used in example as I take an active role in students learning in the classroom. I provide a fun and energetic atmosphere, while emphasizing much theoretical foundation. I accomplish this through using a multi-sensory curriculum. I employ films, audio equipment, Power Point slides, smart boards, experiential exercises and case studies to make material more tangible. In addition, I have begun to incorporate the use of Blackboard and other online technologies to communicate with students and provide supplemental learning. Moreover, I make use of facilitative methods to help students formulate their ideas in the classroom and aid others in their comprehension of the material.

As I have learned through my teaching experiences, my role as a teacher shifts Throughout the learning process. I use myself as a springboard for illustration of concepts and catalyst for difficult discussions. I try to develop a safe learning environment were students are able to be honest, question their reasoning and learn to "think out of the box". I challenge my students to broaden their minds and enhance their awareness of culture, diversity and individual differences. I encourage them to apply what they have learned to their future interactions with others. It is very rewarding when students tell me that they think differently. Plus, how they have applied concepts learned in class to their lives and are better for it professionally and personally.

In the past 14 years, I have come to find that the three objectives I have set as an instructor apply no mater what course I am teaching, 1) to facilitate the appreciation of psychology, 2) to provide fundamental knowledge and tools applicable to student's careers and 3) to enhance self-awareness and understanding of the world around them and the uniqueness of the individuals in it. The way I crystallize these objectives is by allowing the various aspects of who I am, professionally and personally, to be used in example as I take an active role in students learning in the classroom. I provide a fun and energetic atmosphere, while emphasizing much theoretical foundation. I accomplish this through using a multi-sensory curriculum. I employ films, audio equipment, Power Point slides, smart boards, experiential exercises and case studies to make material more tangible. In addition, I have begun to incorporate the use of Blackboard and other online technologies to communicate with students and provide supplemental learning. Moreover, I make use of facilitative methods to help students formulate their ideas in the classroom and aid others in their comprehension of the material.

In the past 14 years, I have come to find that the three objectives I have set as an instructor apply no mater what course I am teaching, 1) to facilitate the appreciation of psychology, 2) to provide fundamental knowledge and tools applicable to student's careers and 3) to enhance self-awareness and understanding of the world around them and the uniqueness of the individuals in it. The way I crystallize these objectives is by allowing the various aspects of who I am, professionally and personally, to be used in example as I take an active role in students learning in the classroom. I provide a fun and energetic atmosphere, while emphasizing much theoretical foundation. I accomplish this through using a multi-sensory curriculum. I employ films, audio equipment, Power Point slides, smart boards, experiential exercises and case studies to make material more tangible. In addition, I have begun to incorporate the use of Blackboard and other online technologies to communicate with students and provide supplemental learning. Moreover, I make use of facilitative methods to help students formulate their ideas in the classroom and aid others in their comprehension of the material.

Why did you choose to enter the field of psychology?

I do not believe I choose the field of psychology. I think it selected me. I can not imagine a time when I was not drawn to others, the field and the aspects of what the propeller is behind behavior and psyche. I believe everyone has a niche in life and knowing you found it is so fulfilling. Also, letting it discover you is a huge part of the fun of living and exploring your career field.

What advice would you give to a student entering The Chicago School?

To be open. It is a great environment to explore and apply techniques in their area of interest.

Professional Skills
diversity issues, personality disorders, sexual offenders, sexually abused children, stereotypes, substance abuse, testing issues, work/life balance, workplace issues