Lonnie Morris

Lonnie

Morris

Lonnie Morris

Department Faculty

  •  
  • Campus:
  • TCS Online
Department
ExCEL IO, Org Leadership & Business Psych
Institution
The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Office Phone
312-488-6095
Email
Biography

Lonnie R. Morris, Jr. is a seasoned higher education professional with nearly 20 years of leadership and service to colleges, universities, education organizations. Dr. Morris leads and supports consultations for education and corporate clients in the areas of change management, leadership development, technology implementation, and diversity & inclusion. The primary focus of his consulting work is helping senior education administrators with department, division, and organization-wide change management and leadership development initiatives. Dr. Morris has extensive experience in university administration as a senior enrollment officer with expertise in the areas of admissions, financial aid, data analysis, marketing research, change management, strategic leadership, and talent development. As director and vice president, Dr. Morris has managed multi-million dollar operating budgets and as many as 5 operational units. Dr. Morris has also served as a senior consultant for higher education and leadership for multiple firms.

Dr. Morris' research interests include the intersections of leadership and (a) ethics, (b) innovation, (c) technology, (d) organizational culture and (e) university administration. He regularly presents practical and scholarly research for regional, national, and international audiences. He is committed to professional and community service evidenced by his roles as Chair of the Ethics Learning Community for the International Leadership Association, board chair for Empowering People in the Community (Philadelphia, PA), and board member for Cheers for a Cause (Washington, DC) and the LMS College Program (Richmond, CA).

Dr. Morris has taught adult students at the undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral levels in business as well as organizational and educational leadership. In addition to teaching courses in change management, group & team leadership, virtual leadership, leadership theory and business communication, he has also developed courses in assessment & data analytics and organizational effectiveness.

Education History
Degree Institution Year
PhD University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 2014
MS Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 2002
BS Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 1997
Professional Memberships
Role Organization
Immediate Past Chair, Ethics International Leadership Association
Member Society for Industrial Organizational Psychology
Community Involvement
Role Organization
Founding President Leadership Alumni Chapter, University of Maryland Eastern Shore
Board Member Cheers for a Cause
Board Member LMS College Project
Areas of Expertise
Area Expertise
Business/IO Psychology Consulting Skills
Leadership
Organizational Behavior
Organizational Culture
Organizational Development
Leadership
Organizational Behavior Management
Career/Workplace Issues Performance Management
Presentations
Title Location Date
Leadership Competencies for Learning and Instruction Paper presented at the annual meeting for the HBCU Faculty Development Network, Crystal City, VA 2017
An ethical leader's guide to social media: Prelude to a framework for leadership ethical digital identity Paper presented at the 2017 annual global meeting for the International Leadership Association, Brussels, Belguim 2017
The Connection between Virtual Leadership and Virtual Learning Paper presented at the annual global meeting for the International Leadership Association, Brussels, Belgium 2017
Ethical Leadership and Social Media: Global Implications for Self-Generated Content Paper presented at the annual meeting for the International Center for Global Leadership, Placencia, Belize 2017
Faculty Hack: Engaging Adult Students in Online Leadership Education Presented at faculty development seminar for Mercer University's Penfield College, Atlanta, GA 2016
Inculculating Virtue: Education and Modern Leadership Presented at the Symposium for Producing Leaders of Character and Integrity hosted by the Center for Ethics and the Rule of Law at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 2016
The Global Exhibition of Leadership Self-Images in 140 Characters or Less: An Ethical Analysis of Education Entrepreneur Social Media Behavior Paper presented at the 2014 global meeting for the International Leadership Association, San Diego, CA 2014
Lead, Plan, Change: A Simple Model for Strategic Planning Workshop at the 2014 annual conference for Net Impact, Minneapolis, MN 2014
Authenticity in Entrepreneurship Paper presented at the 2014 global meeting for the International Leadership Association, San Diego, CA 2014
Student Success Culture: Innovative Thinking in Recruitment and Retention Workshop at the HBCU Student Success Summit hosted by APLU (Association of Public Land-Grant Universities), Atlanta, GA 2014
Navigating the Literature Review to Support Qualitative Inquiry Introduction to Qualitative Research Workshop for Doctoral Students in Educational Leadership presented at Delaware State University, Dover, DE 2014
Understanding the Intersection of Leadership and Entrepreneurship Paper presented at the 2013 global meeting for the International Leadership Association, Montreal, Canada 2013
How Entrepreneurs Create a Culture of Ethical Leadership in Education Start Ups Paper presented at the 2013 global meeting for the International Leadership Association, Montreal, Canada 2013
Engaging Adult Students in Research Intensive, Online Graduate Education Paper presented at the annual meeting for the HBCU Faculty Development Network, Crystal City, VA 2017
Publications
Books

Kidd, T., & Morris, L. R. (2017). Handbook of Research on Instructional Systems and Educational Technology. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Chapters

Morris, L. R. (2015). Ethical leadership. In International Leadership Association (Ed.) Becoming a better leader: Applying key strategies (pp. 45-50). New York: Routledge.

Connally, P., & Morris, L. R. (2017). The impact of emerging technology on leadership development. In Kidd, T., & Morris, L. R. (Ed.) Handbook of Research on Instructional Systems and Education TechnologyHershey, PA: IGI Global.

Morris, L. R., Morse, C., & Jones, T. (2017). How virtual work informs virtual learning. In Kidd, T., & Morris, L. R. (Ed.) Handbook of Research on Instructional Systems and Educational TechnologyHershey, PA: IGI Global.

Journals

Morris, L. R. (2016). Finding inner harmony in the paradoxical co-existence of leadership innovation and ethics. Journal of Leadership Studies, 10 (1), 55-56.

Morris, L. R., Thomas, T., Sippio, D, & Bolton, D. (2017). An ethical leader's guide to social media: Prelude to a framework for leader ethical digital identity. Journal of Global Leadership, 5 , 32-39.

Others

Morris, L. R. (2016). Translating social media schizophrenia into leadership authenticity.. Web Log Post.

Morris, L. R. (2015). Cosby and ethics: How poor leadership in friend circles creates a gateway for the anti-Huxtable.. Web Log Post.

Question and Answer
Please describe your teaching philosophy.

My fascination with leadership and organizations was born in my years as an undergraduate business student. I am drawn to teach in this area because I recognize the significance of its wide application and hence need for its universal comprehension. Early in my career I recognized that leaders in the organizations where I served were proficient in their areas of expertise, but had not necessarily mastered how to lead or how to navigate organizational waters.

Issues related to leadership and organizations stem from the core of social learning theory. As a result, I pay particular attention the student needs, attitudes, and personalities and work to juxtapose those with course structure, interpersonal relations, and the environmental setting at-large. I partner with students, individually and collectively, as an expert guide for this process. As a guide I provide the necessary context, eliminate barriers to exploration, and match explorers with the proper resources. I am a proponent of using technology as a platform to enhance the learning experience. In recent years, I began researching how issues related to leadership and organizations manifest through social media. As an unintended consequence, I often use social media tools to engage students in the sharing and co-creation of leadership and organizational knowledge. This may come in the form of using a site like Mendeley.com to connect with researcher peers and experts. It may appear as an assignment to follow a particular Twitter hashtag for a bird’s eye view of how the world actively engages in leadership and organizational discourse. It could also be issued as a challenge to curate leadership and organization stories, anecdotes, and articles using Flipboard. Whether the classroom is face-to-face, virtual, or a learning laboratory, my goal is the same. I work to actively engage students on the journey to developing the critical thinking skills needed to solve complex organizational problems. I teach in this discipline because I am committed to growing a workforce of subject matter experts who are also competent in matters of leadership and organizations.

Issues related to leadership and organizations stem from the core of social learning theory. As a result, I pay particular attention the student needs, attitudes, and personalities and work to juxtapose those with course structure, interpersonal relations, and the environmental setting at-large. I partner with students, individually and collectively, as an expert guide for this process. As a guide I provide the necessary context, eliminate barriers to exploration, and match explorers with the proper resources.

I am a proponent of using technology as a platform to enhance the learning experience. In recent years, I began researching how issues related to leadership and organizations manifest through social media. As an unintended consequence, I often use social media tools to engage students in the sharing and co-creation of leadership and organizational knowledge. This may come in the form of using a site like Mendeley.com to connect with researcher peers and experts. It may appear as an assignment to follow a particular Twitter hashtag for a bird’s eye view of how the world actively engages in leadership and organizational discourse. It could also be issued as a challenge to curate leadership and organization stories, anecdotes, and articles using Flipboard. Whether the classroom is face-to-face, virtual, or a learning laboratory, my goal is the same. I work to actively engage students on the journey to developing the critical thinking skills needed to solve complex organizational problems. I teach in this discipline because I am committed to growing a workforce of subject matter experts who are also competent in matters of leadership and organizations.

I am a proponent of using technology as a platform to enhance the learning experience. In recent years, I began researching how issues related to leadership and organizations manifest through social media. As an unintended consequence, I often use social media tools to engage students in the sharing and co-creation of leadership and organizational knowledge. This may come in the form of using a site like Mendeley.com to connect with researcher peers and experts. It may appear as an assignment to follow a particular Twitter hashtag for a bird’s eye view of how the world actively engages in leadership and organizational discourse. It could also be issued as a challenge to curate leadership and organization stories, anecdotes, and articles using Flipboard.

Whether the classroom is face-to-face, virtual, or a learning laboratory, my goal is the same. I work to actively engage students on the journey to developing the critical thinking skills needed to solve complex organizational problems. I teach in this discipline because I am committed to growing a workforce of subject matter experts who are also competent in matters of leadership and organizations.

Whether the classroom is face-to-face, virtual, or a learning laboratory, my goal is the same. I work to actively engage students on the journey to developing the critical thinking skills needed to solve complex organizational problems. I teach in this discipline because I am committed to growing a workforce of subject matter experts who are also competent in matters of leadership and organizations.