Margaret Smith

Margaret

Smith

Margaret Smith

Director, Clinical Training

  •  
  • Campus:
  • New Orleans, LA
Department
Clinical Psychology
Institution
The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Address Map of 1 Drexel Dr New Orleans LA 70125
1 Drexel Dr
New Orleans, LA 70125
Office Phone
504-520-7287
Email [email protected]
Biography

Dr. Smith graduated from The Chicago School of Professional Psychology in 2002. She worked in community mental health settings as a provider and supervisor for six years prior to entering into academia. She served for ten years in clinical training at another university prior to coming to New Orleans to serve as the Director of Clinical Training at The Xavier University of Louisiana Chicago School campus. She has worked with a diverse range of people and has research interests in cross-cultural communication, mentoring, diversity competency development and measurement of competency in the evaluation of psychologists. She currently serves as the Chair of the Diversity Committee for APPIC.

Education History
Degree Institution Year
Psy.D. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, IL 2002
M.A. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, IL 2000
B.A. Saint Xavier University, Chicago, IL 1989
Professional Memberships
Role Organization
Member American Psychological Association
Member Louisiana Psychological Association
Member Society of Indian Psychologists
Licenses
Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Illinois
Presentations
Title Location Date
Suprahuman Indigeneity in Academia: Invisibility, Tokenism and Response Kautokeino, Norway 2018
Diverse Women in Leadership Panel Chicago, IL 2018
Making the Invisible Visible: Mentoring Students in Navigating Microaggressions Across the Cultural Divide in Academia Atlanta, GA 2016
Incorporating Motivational Interviewing Techniques in Working with Difficult Clients Lake Villa, IL 2015
Publications
Journals

Smith, M., Wheeler, M., Kenney, J. & Loerzel, M. (2019). Suprahuman Indigeneity in Academia: Invisibility, Tokenism and Response.. (In Progress), ,

Rodolfa, E., Greenberg, S., Hunsley, J., Smith-Zoeller, M., Cox, D., Sammons, M., Caro, C., Spivak, H. (2013). A Competency Model for the Practice of Psychology.. Training and Education in Professional Psychology, 7 (2), 71-83.

Websites

Smith, M., Teehee, M., Straits, K., Knudsen, M. & Rose, A.. (2017). The Society of Indian Psychologists (SIP) Educational Paper Regarding the Use of Counterterrorism Tactics on Native Peoples and Allies. Retrieved from https://nebula.wsimg.com/76159be11377d058cba1c070ae2b6326?AccessKeyId=3BBC34B5002E1951E7BE&disposition=0&alloworigin=1

Media Exposure
Appearance

https://www.apa.org/monitor/2018/02/cover-standing-rock

Question and Answer
Please describe your teaching philosophy.

Having come from a background of clinical psychology as a Practitioner-Scholar, I view my role as a faculty educator as one of providing an optimal learning experience to students who are aspiring colleagues. I believe that students learn best when treated with dignity and respect, and I endeavor to do so with regard to the unique diverse presentation of each student. By this I mean that what I find dignified and respectful communication is driven by my own diversity factors. Each student also has their own lens through which the world is viewed. I am highly attentive to this in my interactions and adept at bridging perceived divides.

Students are most likely to grow and learn when they feel that they are invested in. I demonstrate my investment in them through taking time to understand their interests and who they are as people. While their goals may be expressed in static terms, I am considering the personal and real world dynamic realities and work with them to understand the interplay between the two. This is also consistent with how I view myself in the context of academia and community engagement. I recognize the responsibilities inherent in being a clinical psychologist that expand well beyond the classroom and course content. I actively engage in multiple areas of interest that I hold as a psychologist. The work that I’ve done locally in community and nationally in the field comes from a desire to model for students the range they might envision for themselves. I find it personally fulfilling to do the work that I have done and I believe it enriches student experience to know that what they are learning has broader application. Student engagement with society beyond the context of academia must first begin when we as faculty thoughtfully create and foster such connections ourselves. My own process involves critical reflection on the degree to which any project reasonably benefits the prospective community and to what extent that community has had genuine and demonstrated investment made in it by academia or faculty. I believe in the importance of relationships being developed independent of an outcome that benefits an academic institution. My emphasis is on collaborative community centered and driven projects that are fully invested partnerships. This comes from my genuine desire to decolonize our processes experientially and interactively in order to maintain integrity in the work that we do. I invite students and faculty alike to consider the ethical and societal complexities when we engage in service, conduct research, do presentations or consider course material. Classroom discourse optimally occurs when the stage is set for safety in learning. Safety is a relative construct that has different parameters cross-culturally. I am mindful of my role relative to students and what assumptions are made about it and about me. I have been fortunate to teach in programs whose student body represents a great deal of diversity, ranging from diversity aspects of race, ethnicity, religion, age, experience, disability, socio-economic, sexual orientation and, of course, gender. I view my role as navigating communication cross-culturally with a group of invested learners. I find it imperative to accurately assess who the students are in any given class, seminar or advisement role first and adapt my communication strategies. I do this through respectful dialogue, individual meetings and experiential activities developed by me to cultivate safety in communication. Envisioning students as having the potential to be colleagues in the future, I consider how feedback on comportment, professionalism and interpersonal effectiveness are critical to their development. It’s important for me to provide such feedback respectfully and consistently, and I frame it relative to the American Psychological Association competency benchmarks. My goal is to help students to socialize to the field of psychology more readily in order to best be prepared. In practical terms, I help students expand what they are learning today into a future vision of application into their practica, internship and work in the field as professionals. I also see my role as being one of cultivating critical thinkers through both discourse and modeling. I work to expand their awareness of the future role of psychologists as being one involved in more than the provision of direct service. Rather, I want them to consider how the material they are learning today may have application in future career interest areas of research, training, program development, project oversight, advocacy, and legislation. I accomplish the goals as stated above in a variety of ways. I incorporate into my lecture practical examples that relate to the subject matter being discussed, from my experience in the field. I bring in articles from current events and link them to the materials and information related to changes in the field and their future implication for practice. I have used these strategies across the different classes and seminars that I have taught. I engage students in lively discourse regarding both sides of how something being taught may be seen. Where appropriate to do so, I have modified syllabi prior to beginning a class in order to incorporate newer source material and develop assignments around best practices. One example of this would be when I taught a substance abuse treatment and approaches course. Rather than having students present facts on a particular substance and its effects, I wanted them to engage in a critical thinking process. To this end, I had students access SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practices (NREPP), select an evidence based practice based on their interest in a particular population and present on it, along with a critical analysis of the strengths and limitations of the program. Since that time, a government official has elected to effectively close the site. Had I been teaching the course during that time, I would have included this as a part of the ongoing discussion of the intersection between best practices, politics and evidence based treatments. I also include relevant diversity aspects in classroom lecture, notes and discussions consistently, and students are encouraged by me to ask questions or bring their thoughts and experiences to our collaborative learning process. In teaching content courses, I consider the relevant socio-historical context of the material relative to the socio-historical lens that the student may come from in order to bridge potential divides that may exist. For those content courses I’ve taught, I review new research findings, models and trends in advance of the subject in order to bring students relevant information regarding evidence based findings and best practices.

Students are most likely to grow and learn when they feel that they are invested in. I demonstrate my investment in them through taking time to understand their interests and who they are as people. While their goals may be expressed in static terms, I am considering the personal and real world dynamic realities and work with them to understand the interplay between the two. This is also consistent with how I view myself in the context of academia and community engagement.

I recognize the responsibilities inherent in being a clinical psychologist that expand well beyond the classroom and course content. I actively engage in multiple areas of interest that I hold as a psychologist. The work that I’ve done locally in community and nationally in the field comes from a desire to model for students the range they might envision for themselves. I find it personally fulfilling to do the work that I have done and I believe it enriches student experience to know that what they are learning has broader application. Student engagement with society beyond the context of academia must first begin when we as faculty thoughtfully create and foster such connections ourselves. My own process involves critical reflection on the degree to which any project reasonably benefits the prospective community and to what extent that community has had genuine and demonstrated investment made in it by academia or faculty. I believe in the importance of relationships being developed independent of an outcome that benefits an academic institution. My emphasis is on collaborative community centered and driven projects that are fully invested partnerships. This comes from my genuine desire to decolonize our processes experientially and interactively in order to maintain integrity in the work that we do. I invite students and faculty alike to consider the ethical and societal complexities when we engage in service, conduct research, do presentations or consider course material. Classroom discourse optimally occurs when the stage is set for safety in learning. Safety is a relative construct that has different parameters cross-culturally. I am mindful of my role relative to students and what assumptions are made about it and about me. I have been fortunate to teach in programs whose student body represents a great deal of diversity, ranging from diversity aspects of race, ethnicity, religion, age, experience, disability, socio-economic, sexual orientation and, of course, gender. I view my role as navigating communication cross-culturally with a group of invested learners. I find it imperative to accurately assess who the students are in any given class, seminar or advisement role first and adapt my communication strategies. I do this through respectful dialogue, individual meetings and experiential activities developed by me to cultivate safety in communication. Envisioning students as having the potential to be colleagues in the future, I consider how feedback on comportment, professionalism and interpersonal effectiveness are critical to their development. It’s important for me to provide such feedback respectfully and consistently, and I frame it relative to the American Psychological Association competency benchmarks. My goal is to help students to socialize to the field of psychology more readily in order to best be prepared. In practical terms, I help students expand what they are learning today into a future vision of application into their practica, internship and work in the field as professionals. I also see my role as being one of cultivating critical thinkers through both discourse and modeling. I work to expand their awareness of the future role of psychologists as being one involved in more than the provision of direct service. Rather, I want them to consider how the material they are learning today may have application in future career interest areas of research, training, program development, project oversight, advocacy, and legislation. I accomplish the goals as stated above in a variety of ways. I incorporate into my lecture practical examples that relate to the subject matter being discussed, from my experience in the field. I bring in articles from current events and link them to the materials and information related to changes in the field and their future implication for practice. I have used these strategies across the different classes and seminars that I have taught. I engage students in lively discourse regarding both sides of how something being taught may be seen. Where appropriate to do so, I have modified syllabi prior to beginning a class in order to incorporate newer source material and develop assignments around best practices. One example of this would be when I taught a substance abuse treatment and approaches course. Rather than having students present facts on a particular substance and its effects, I wanted them to engage in a critical thinking process. To this end, I had students access SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practices (NREPP), select an evidence based practice based on their interest in a particular population and present on it, along with a critical analysis of the strengths and limitations of the program. Since that time, a government official has elected to effectively close the site. Had I been teaching the course during that time, I would have included this as a part of the ongoing discussion of the intersection between best practices, politics and evidence based treatments. I also include relevant diversity aspects in classroom lecture, notes and discussions consistently, and students are encouraged by me to ask questions or bring their thoughts and experiences to our collaborative learning process. In teaching content courses, I consider the relevant socio-historical context of the material relative to the socio-historical lens that the student may come from in order to bridge potential divides that may exist. For those content courses I’ve taught, I review new research findings, models and trends in advance of the subject in order to bring students relevant information regarding evidence based findings and best practices.

I recognize the responsibilities inherent in being a clinical psychologist that expand well beyond the classroom and course content. I actively engage in multiple areas of interest that I hold as a psychologist. The work that I’ve done locally in community and nationally in the field comes from a desire to model for students the range they might envision for themselves. I find it personally fulfilling to do the work that I have done and I believe it enriches student experience to know that what they are learning has broader application. Student engagement with society beyond the context of academia must first begin when we as faculty thoughtfully create and foster such connections ourselves.

My own process involves critical reflection on the degree to which any project reasonably benefits the prospective community and to what extent that community has had genuine and demonstrated investment made in it by academia or faculty. I believe in the importance of relationships being developed independent of an outcome that benefits an academic institution. My emphasis is on collaborative community centered and driven projects that are fully invested partnerships. This comes from my genuine desire to decolonize our processes experientially and interactively in order to maintain integrity in the work that we do. I invite students and faculty alike to consider the ethical and societal complexities when we engage in service, conduct research, do presentations or consider course material.

Classroom discourse optimally occurs when the stage is set for safety in learning. Safety is a relative construct that has different parameters cross-culturally. I am mindful of my role relative to students and what assumptions are made about it and about me. I have been fortunate to teach in programs whose student body represents a great deal of diversity, ranging from diversity aspects of race, ethnicity, religion, age, experience, disability, socio-economic, sexual orientation and, of course, gender. I view my role as navigating communication cross-culturally with a group of invested learners. I find it imperative to accurately assess who the students are in any given class, seminar or advisement role first and adapt my communication strategies. I do this through respectful dialogue, individual meetings and experiential activities developed by me to cultivate safety in communication.

Envisioning students as having the potential to be colleagues in the future, I consider how feedback on comportment, professionalism and interpersonal effectiveness are critical to their development. It’s important for me to provide such feedback respectfully and consistently, and I frame it relative to the American Psychological Association competency benchmarks. My goal is to help students to socialize to the field of psychology more readily in order to best be prepared.

In practical terms, I help students expand what they are learning today into a future vision of application into their practica, internship and work in the field as professionals. I also see my role as being one of cultivating critical thinkers through both discourse and modeling. I work to expand their awareness of the future role of psychologists as being one involved in more than the provision of direct service. Rather, I want them to consider how the material they are learning today may have application in future career interest areas of research, training, program development, project oversight, advocacy, and legislation.

I accomplish the goals as stated above in a variety of ways. I incorporate into my lecture practical examples that relate to the subject matter being discussed, from my experience in the field. I bring in articles from current events and link them to the materials and information related to changes in the field and their future implication for practice. I have used these strategies across the different classes and seminars that I have taught. I engage students in lively discourse regarding both sides of how something being taught may be seen.

Where appropriate to do so, I have modified syllabi prior to beginning a class in order to incorporate newer source material and develop assignments around best practices. One example of this would be when I taught a substance abuse treatment and approaches course. Rather than having students present facts on a particular substance and its effects, I wanted them to engage in a critical thinking process. To this end, I had students access SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practices (NREPP), select an evidence based practice based on their interest in a particular population and present on it, along with a critical analysis of the strengths and limitations of the program. Since that time, a government official has elected to effectively close the site. Had I been teaching the course during that time, I would have included this as a part of the ongoing discussion of the intersection between best practices, politics and evidence based treatments.

I also include relevant diversity aspects in classroom lecture, notes and discussions consistently, and students are encouraged by me to ask questions or bring their thoughts and experiences to our collaborative learning process. In teaching content courses, I consider the relevant socio-historical context of the material relative to the socio-historical lens that the student may come from in order to bridge potential divides that may exist. For those content courses I’ve taught, I review new research findings, models and trends in advance of the subject in order to bring students relevant information regarding evidence based findings and best practices.