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B.A. in Psychology

Addiction Studies Minor

  • Los Angeles, CA
  • Full-Time, Part-Time
  • 4 Years Full-time, 8 Years Part-time

The Chicago School’s B.A. in Psychology, Addiction Studies Minor provides a path to make a difference for students interested in counseling and providing support to those who struggle with drug or alcohol challenges, or who are in treatment or recovery. The program focuses on preparing you to become a certified substance abuse counselor. According to the U.S. […]

The Chicago School’s B.A. in Psychology, Addiction Studies Minor provides a path to make a difference for students interested in counseling and providing support to those who struggle with drug or alcohol challenges, or who are in treatment or recovery. The program focuses on preparing you to become a certified substance abuse counselor.

According to the U.S. Occupational Outlook Handbook, there will be 28,200 new openings for substance abuse counselors from 2012-2022.  Additionally, many states are now requiring that substance abuse counselors have earned a bachelor’s degree prior to achieving certification. A bachelor’s degree also serves as a distinction of quality in many states that also lowers the required field experience hours prior to certification.

The B.A. Psychology, Addiction Studies Minor explores topics such as chemical dependency, crisis intervention, neuropsychology for addiction studies, and how to recognize signs and symptoms of substance abuse.

In addition to preparing for licensure to become an addiction counselor, graduates of the B.A. Psychology, Addiction Studies Minor may work in a number of career areas, including:

  • Treatment centers
  • Hospitals
  • School Districts
  • Methadone clinics

Professionals with certifications and licenses in their respective states may work with:

  • Community-based organizations
  • Organizations
  • Government agencies
  • Health care agencies
  • Courts
  • Mental health agencies
  • Sober living settings
  • Educational institutions
  • Substance abuse recovery centers
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Alcohol and Other Drugs in Our Society: Introduction to Chemical Dependency 

This course provides a historical, sociological and scientific perspective on the use, abuse and addiction of alcohol and other drugs. A comprehensive review of social control of psychoactive and other mood-altering drugs. The history of alcohol, tobacco and nicotine in the society, including alcohol use disorders. This course overviews the biopsychosocial nature of addiction; the impact of addiction on families and society; regulations and drug policy; contemporary treatment and prevention approaches; and the addiction counseling profession.

Neuropsychology for Addiction Studies

This course is a comprehensive introduction and examination of human neuropsychology and is intended to provide students with a basic understanding of the relationship between the brain and behavior. It will provide the basis for appreciating the many different ways in which behavior is related to specific regions of the human brain. Topics will include foundations of neuropsychology, structure of the nervous system, functional specialization of the brain, as well as cognitive functions and assessment of brain disorders. Additional topics include: physiological, psychological, and behavioral effects of drug and alcohol addiction; pharmacological management; metabolic, neurological processes, and drug use during the perinatal period; syndromes of withdrawal; abstinence, synergistic effects, risk factors; and integrates multidisciplinary treatment considerations.

Basic Counseling Skills in Addiction Studies and Treatment

An introduction to the basic skills and techniques of counseling for addiction counselors. This course describes characteristics of an effective counselor, explores several theoretical models of counseling, and assists the individual to develop skills in active listening, building trust, reflecting feelings and content, and using motivational interviewing techniques.

There are state professional licensure and/or certification requirements to practice as an addiction treatment provider. Titles for practice as an addiction treatment provider vary by state. Some of the titles include Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor, Certified Addiction Professional, Licensed Addiction Counselor, Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor, Licensed Associate Substance Abuse Counselor, and Licensed Associate Substance Abuse Counselor. A state’s professional practice board determines the specific requirements for candidates seeking licensure and/or certification and those requirements are subject to change. The following is professional practice information as of the date of publication:

  • The Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, Addiction Studies minor program is aligned with degree and/or coursework requirements for eligibility to practice as an addiction treatment provider in the District of Columbia and all states except for Colorado, Hawaii, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin.
  • Further information regarding the specific license or certification that the Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, Addiction Studies minor program aligns with by state is available online.

It is the student’s responsibility to monitor the licensing and/or certification requirements in their state, as they are subject to change. Additional state-specific requirements beyond the program’s graduation requirements may be required. Some state requirements include the following: post-degree field work, state specific coursework, additional internship or field experience hours, examination, and application.

*The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is not currently accepting applications for the online BA Psychology, Addiction Studies Minor program from individuals who live in or who intend to complete their practicum or internship at a site located in these states: California, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, New Hampshire, New 1York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

This course provides a supervised field-instruction experience in approved community agencies that serve clients in the field of addiction treatment.

Focus is on the beginning development and use of helping skills, client records documentation and service coordination. Self-awareness and beginning professional growth are also emphasized. This course is required for the state certification exam.

Admission to the B.A. Psychology, Addiction Studies Minor is open to any person who meets entrance requirements as outlined below. Applicants will be judged on their overall ability to successfully complete an undergraduate degree program. Generally, a high school cumulative GPA of a 2.3 or higher on a 4.0 scale is required for admission. However, applicants with a cumulative high school GPA below 2.3 or applicants seeking admission with a GED will be considered for admission with the submission of additional required documents. Applicants providing proof of an earned Associate degree will be expected to demonstrate an undergraduate cumulative GPA of 2.3 or higher. It is recommended that transcripts are submitted from all undergraduate schools where credit was received (and no degree was earned) to support their application and request for transfer credit. (See Undergraduate Transfer Credit Policy).

Factors and materials to be considered for admission will include:

  • Completed application and $50 application fee
  • Applicants must provide proof of the qualifying conferral – high school graduation (or the equivalent) or proof of an earned Associate degree. Proof of qualifying conferral must be provided in one of the following ways:
    • Official high school transcript showing an earned high school diploma and date of graduation. A copy of a high school diploma, if transcripts are not immediately available, can be submitted with a contingency that original transcripts will be on file prior to day 9 of the term/semester of entry. Financial aid will not be disbursed until the compliant documentation is received.
    • Official Associate degree transcript from a regionally-accredited institution showing degree earned and date conferred
    • Official college transcript from a regionally-accredited institution that contains the high school name and date of graduation
    • Official NACES or AICE evaluation of an international diploma that contains the high school name and date of graduation
    • High school equivalency completed through home schooling as defined by state law
    • Official General Educational Development (GED) document. A copy of the student’s GED Certificate, or unofficial GED score issued by the state, can be submitted with a contingency that the Official GED document will be on file prior to close of census. Financial aid will not be disbursed until the compliant documentation is received.
    • Official Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC) document
    • Official High School Equivalency Test (HiSET) document
    • Official documentation showing a passing score on a state-authorized exam that the state recognizes as equivalent to high school graduation
    • Letter showing the date of graduation written on high school letterhead and signed by a high school administrator with an academic title
    • Form DD214 showing the high school name and date of graduation, if listed.

Applicants with a cumulative high-school or undergraduate GPA below 2.3 and applicants seeking admission with high school equivalency documentation that does not show a GPA (such as GED, home school, or testing) are required to submit additional documentation

  • Curriculum Vita/ Resume
  • One Letter of recommendation (Optional)
  • Essay of intent
  • Please compose a written essay to answer the questions below. Your essay should be typed, double-spaced, and three pages (approximately 500-750 words) while clearly addressing the program for which you are applying.
  • Psychology is a vast discipline with many career options:
    • Why are you interested in this particular program to earn your undergraduate degree in psychology? Cite specific experiences and examples.
    • What are your professional career goals as they relate to this degree? Why do you believe this program will assist you in reaching these goals?
    • Why is it important to you to study this discipline at a school that emphasizes cultural awareness, competence, and understanding of diversity (see our Commitment to Diversity Statement)?
    • If you are a first generation undergraduate degree student, please integrate this into your essay.

SAT/ACT scores are not required for admission, however applicants who have taken the SAT/ACT may submit their scores to enhance their application.

The Chicago School is dedicated to keeping our professional degree programs accessible to anyone regardless of financial status. In addition to the scholarships that may be available, our Financial Aid department will help provide you with information to determine what financial arrangements are right for you.

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