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Dual Degree M.A. Industrial/Organizational Psychology: Internship Track and Master of Legal Studies

  • Washington, D.C.
  • Full-Time
  • 3 Years

The field of organizational psychology is expected to grow much faster than average for all occupations according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Further, to navigate the complex areas where organizational needs and the law intersect will require an acumen that includes foundations in organizational psychology as well as legal studies. Professionals who hold a […]

The field of organizational psychology is expected to grow much faster than average for all occupations according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Further, to navigate the complex areas where organizational needs and the law intersect will require an acumen that includes foundations in organizational psychology as well as legal studies. Professionals who hold a dual degree that encompasses both of these disciplines will be uniquely qualified to find successful careers in this field.

To fill this need, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology® and The Santa Barbara & Ventura Colleges of Law® have developed a collaborative program—the M.A. Industrial/Organizational Psychology: Internship Track and Master of Legal Studies dual-degree program.

With years of experience in their respective fields, faculty from both of these institutions will help students establish a foundation that will help them find careers in the following areas:

  • Consultation
  • Marketing
  • Human resources
  • Leadership
  • Government
  • Business
  • Nonprofit

Industrial and Organizational Psychology

In the M.A. Industrial and Organizational Psychology (I/O) program, students will examine workplace performance and efficiency and ways in which to improve. Including diagnostic and consultative skills, students will design and implement assessment centers and 360-degree feedback tools.

Master of Legal Studies

The entirely online Master of Legal Studies (M.L.S.) degree program examines the fundamentals of law—paying particular attention to where the legal field intersects with business needs. Law-related challenges arise in nearly every field, and students in this M.L.S. program will learn to navigate those challenges and effectively communication their implications to stakeholders. The M.L.S. program does not qualify graduates to sit for California’s Bar Examination, nor does it satisfy requirements for admission to practice law in California.

Washington, D.C. Student Experience

Surrounded by much of the nation’s historical and cultural riches, students will have the opportunity to benefit from a location essential to much of the United States’ political, governmental, and multi-national affairs.

Expanding on the success of the Chicago, Los Angeles, and Orange County, Calif. campuses, the Washington, D.C. Campus reflects The Chicago School’s commitment to diversity and effort to expand mental health services to multicultural and underserved communities.

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American Legal Systems

This course will introduce students to the Anglo-American system of law including sources of law such as Constitutions, statutes, case law, common law and regulations; the structure, jurisdiction, and functions of U.S. courts at both the federal and state levels; the role of law in American society; and the roles and responsibilities of legal professionals.

Professional Development

This course is designed to provide students with the core professional skills necessary for competing successfully for I/O positions, such as: socialization into the profession of I/O psychology, critical thinking skills, and written communication. Topics covered include networking, interpersonal skills, self-awareness, critical thinking and writing skills, business and systems logic, professional organization and networks, business etiquette, and competencies needed for successful job placement.

Organizational Culture and Design

This course explores organizations at the organizational level, examining the relationship between culture and organization design, structure, and environment. It examines the impact of change in strategy and technology, environmental turbulence and organizational maturity, and reviews organization development as a means to advance the changing nature of organization. Supporting topics include corporate ethics, life cycle and control, organizational climate, and globalization. Students will create an organizational change strategy for a company in turmoil.

Students will complete two 300-credit-hour internships (for a total of 600 hours of internship experience). The internship should involve the student in learning specific, transferable, I/O-relevant or HR-relevant professional skills. All internships must be pre-approved by the faculty internship supervisor.

The Capstone Project allows a student to study and research his or her area of choice in depth with expert faculty at both the Colleges of Law and The Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

M.A. Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Application to the M.A. Industrial and Organizational Psychology program is open to any person who has earned a bachelor’s degree from a regionally-accredited institution and who meets other entrance requirements. Applicants will be judged on their overall ability to do graduate work. Factors that are considered in admission are:

  • GPA from undergraduate and any graduate schools
  • Successful work history after completion of the baccalaureate degree
  • Admission essay
  • Letters of recommendation from academic professors or professional or volunteer experience supervisors

Generally, an undergraduate GPA of a 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale is required for admission. Applicants must submit official transcripts from all schools where a degree was earned. It is recommended that transcripts are submitted from all schools where credit was received to support their applications. Students must choose their track (Internship or Applied Research Project) upon matriculation.

Master of Legal Studies

To be considered for admission, an M.L.S. applicant must have submitted the required application, fee, at least one letter of recommendation written by someone other than a family member or close relative, and a personal statement of at least 3 pages in length, that is double-spaced and typed in no larger than 12-point typeface, and:

  • An official transcript showing the conferral of a bachelor’s degree with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.3 from an accredited college or university. (Those who do not meet the GPA requirement, but show an ability to succeed at graduate-level work through professional or other experience, may be considered by the Admissions Committee on a case-by-case basis. Applicants with a cumulative GPA of less than 2.0 are not eligible for admission.)
  • TOEFL scores or transcripts showing an English composition class with a grade of “C” or better may be required of students for whom English is the second language.
  • Official transcripts showing degree conferral with the appropriate GPA, and TOEFL scores (if required), must be submitted within 30 days of the start of the student’s first term of enrollment. Failure to submit required official transcripts by the due date will result in a student being withdrawn from the school and unregistered from all future courses.

Additional Internship Track Admission Requirements

Aside from general admission requirements, the Internship Track requires an applicant to have successfully completed (with a grade earned of “C” or better) two (2) specific undergraduate courses:

  • One course in psychology
  • One course in statistics or quantitative psychology

Applicants in the Internship Track who have not previously successfully completed an undergraduate statistics or quantitative psychology course with The Chicago School will be enrolled according to the policies outlined in the Student at Large section of this catalog prior to be admitted to the program. Applicants in the Internship Track who have not previously successfully completed an undergraduate course in psychology must complete the course in accordance with the policies outlined in the Internship Track Progression Requirements section below.

Internship Track Progression Requirements

This program requires applicants to have successfully completed (with a grade earned of ‘C’ or better) at least one (1) undergraduate course in psychology by the end of their first semester (second term for online students) of study. Students must successfully meet this progression requirement through one of the following options:

  • A grade of “C” or higher in TCS 380 – Introduction to Psychology
  • A grade of “C” or higher in a comparable course at the Chicago School
  • A grade of “C” or higher in a comparable course at another regionally accredited institution

Applicants accepted with no previous undergraduate psychology coursework will be required to register for TCS 380 in their first ground semester or online term. All students must then meet this progression requirement by the end of their first semester (second term for online students) of study. Students who do not successfully fulfill this requirement will not be allowed to register in any future coursework in the program of study until this requirement is met. Extensions can be granted by the Program Chair or designee when extenuating circumstances prevent completion of the requirement in the specified timeframe. Requests for an extension must be submitted in writing to the Program Chair for consideration.

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not required for the dual degree program; however, we encourage students to submit their scores to enhance their application. Please note that you must have your official scores sent to The Chicago School (School Code 1119).

Applicants for the dual-degree program will not be required to take the LSAT, GRE, GMAT or any other graduate admissions test. However, applicants for whom English is their second language will be required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and submit their official score to the Colleges of Law or, alternatively, submit a transcript showing that they have completed a college-level English composition class with a grade of “C” or higher.

The Chicago School is dedicated to keeping our professional degree programs accessible to anyone regardless of financial status. In addition to the scholarships that may be available, our Financial Aid department will help provide you with information to determine what financial arrangements are right for you.

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